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Exercise activities for older people

Exercise activities for older and elderly people

There are many myths around whether you should regularly exercise at an older age. Research from many different sources say exercise is good for you as it helps you keep active for longer. It also suggests that it helps lower risks for a variety of conditions. Exercise is good for your body, mind, mood and memory. We looked at some activities that would be good for older people perhaps in their 60’s or above.

The advised amount of exercise recommended per week is 150 minutes. There are a lot of activities out there that you can try at home or visit your local gym or pool. If you have been inactive for a long time it’s best to work up gradually as your body will need time to adapt.

Swimming is great if you want to be more active and can be taken up at whatever age. Regularly swimming can help boost your mood and reduce the risks of chronic illnesses. You can begin by visiting your local pool and finding out what lessons would be best suited to your needs or ability.

Walking is simple and free. There’s a lot of freedom around it as you can take a walk whenever and wherever you want. It helps you lose weight and become healthier. The only thing you need before you start is a pair of shoes, preferably shoes that are comfortable and supportive. If you wanted to make the walk more relaxing, wearing loose-fitted clothes could help you move more freely. For longer walks you could take some water and healthy snacks.

Activities and benefits

Age UK also put together a few benefits of individual exercises. If you are suffering from a health condition we advise you to consult your GP first.

Activity/excerciseFlexibilityStrengthStaminaBalance
Brisk walking
Climbing stairs
Swimming
Dancing
Bowls or golf
Yoga
Tai chi

Improving your fitness

Be active around the house.
Cooking, housework, walking or jogging while you’re on the phone can help when it comes to keeping you mobile. These small exercises can make big differences for you when you tally it all up at the end of each week.

Improve your strength, balance and flexibility
Participating in regular Yoga classes can do great works for your health. It is suitable for all ability levels and it mixes a series of poses with breathing. This is great for improving your balance, flexibility and core strength.

Some benefits of Yoga:

Lowers Stress Increases ConfidenceReduces Risk of Injury
Tones Muscles Improves BreathingHelps With Weight Loss

 

Try something new
If you’re not sure what activities you’d like and are suitable for you, you can take this 60-second test to see the best sport for you. The test takes into consideration many factors like height, pain tolerance, co-ordination and many other factors to give you an indication to which sports you are best suited for.

Exercises for older people

Walking
Walking fast is an easy way of increasing your activity levels. If you can walk instead of catching public transport then it would be a good idea to get that extra bit of fitness in.

Gardening
Spicing up your garden can much more for you than you can imagine depending on how much work you have to put in. Exercises include pushing, bending, squatting, carrying, digging and shovelling which when combines can provide a great workout.

Take up running
Running is an effective and straightforward way of exercising. Regular exercise can help relieve stress and give you more energy throughout the day.

Below we have a great piece of work from the NHS which gives you some great exercises

 

References

http://www.helpguide.org/articles/exercise-fitness/exercise-and-fitness-as-you-age.htm
http://www.ageuk.org.uk/health-wellbeing/keeping-your-body-healthy/healthy-living/what-exercise-might-suit-you/
http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/getting-started-guides/Pages/getting-started-swimming.aspx
http://www.zmescience.com/medicine/exercising-helps-preserve-the-elderly-53454/